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Monday, November 30, 2015

Peer Review and Mentoring Grant info now available

Information for the 2015-2016 Peer Review and Mentoring Grant is available at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/PRMG.  The application form will be posted tomorrow (December 1).

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

PDP Team Refresher Training Now Available!

Educators who were previously trained to be a PDP team member have a valid PDP certification that will expire June 30, 2016.  To renew the certification for another five years, an online refresher course is required.  Click here to Get Started.

Monday, November 16, 2015

Highly Qualified Teacher Plans

As part of the federal requirement to monitor educators who are not highly qualified under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) collects information on the number of educators who are not highly qualified. This monitoring process requires that annually by November 15, every district submit the Highly Qualified Teacher Plan (PI-9550-IIC) listing educators they employ for the current school year who are “not highly qualified.” Even if every core academic subject educator in the district is “highly qualified,” the district must still submit this form to meet federal compliance.

If your district has not already done so, please submit the PI-9550-IIC by December 4, 2015. Reporting forms and sample parent letters available at: http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/programs/-highly-qualified-teachers.  Submit reports to Eyvonne Crawford-Gray by FAX, email, or U.S. mail as noted on the form.  If you have technical questions about highly qualified provisions and need assistance, please feel free to contact julie.hagen@dpi.wi.gov.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

PI-1202 Fall Staff Report Deadline Extended

The deadline for submitting the PI-1202 Fall Staff Report data through the WISEstaff application has been moved back to Wednesday, November 25th to provide districts additional time to complete the process.  License audits will begin November 30th.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

PDP Team Refresher Training


The refresher training for current PDP Team members whose certification 6/30/2016 will be completely online.  Our IT team is still working out a few bugs with the self-registration process.  We expect that it should be available in the next two weeks or so.

Friday, September 11, 2015

Peer Review and Mentoring Grant - Update

We apologize that applications and guidelines for the 2015-2016 Peer Review and Mentoring Grant are not yet available.  The grants are going to be one of our state’s strategies for our federally required Teacher Equitable Access Plan (http://esea.dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/esea/pdf/WisconsinEdEquityPlan.pdf), and that plan was only recently approved by the US Department of Education.

We are working on guidelines that meet the needs of both the nine districts identified in that plan and all of the other districts that were not identified.

If you have not already done so, please contact your CESA and/or other school districts to form a consortium.  The rules for the grant can be found in PI 38 (http://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/code/admin_code/pi/38).

“Being Teacher of the Year is not about me”

So said one of the four educators who was surprised last week with the news they were selected as a 2015-16 Wisconsin Teacher of the Year.

New DPI videos let you see the four honorees’ reactions and hear what they told State Superintendent Tony Evers about what makes them great teachers, and why, despite the many challenges these days, teaching is still a great profession for the right person.

The four videos, shot in the teachers’ schools in Kimberly, Milwaukee, Eau Claire, and Holmen, are available here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhyAMZQdbxJ3Y0yRm4aGR3Ispn4v9mIjD


Please direct any questions or comments about this news item to Tom McCarthy, DPI communications officer, 608-266-3559, thomas.mccarthy@dpi.wi.gov

License Based on Reciprocity

Teachers and administrators who hold a valid license in good standing from another state, have at least one year of experience under that license, and have an offer of employment from a school in Wisconsin can now apply through our License Based on Reciprocity Pathway.  Applicants must submit a PI-1622-LICOOS form signed by the employing district with their application in ELO.  Directions for applying can be found at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/licensing/elo-reciprocity.

Please note that educators licensed under this pathway are not necessarily considered "Highly Qualified" for the purposes of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).  Wisconsin's definition of HQ includes passing required content tests (e.g., Praxis II, Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test), which educators are not required to pass for this pathway.  For more information on "Highly Qualified", please see http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/programs/-highly-qualified-teachers.  

Monday, August 31, 2015

Experience-based Technology Education License

We are now accepting applications for the Experienced-based License in Technology Education.  Please go to its pathway page for information and directions on how to apply.  This license is based on a system of points and allows individuals who have experience in both a technical field and pedagogy to be issued a license to teach Technology Education.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Peer Review and Mentoring Grant

For the past few years, the Educator Effectiveness team has administered the Peer Review and Mentoring Grant (PRMG).  Starting with the 2015-2016 school year, it is coming back to the Teacher Education, Professional Development, and Licensing team.

We have not yet published the requirements and application for the 2015-2016 Peer Review and Mentoring Grant.  Our priorities have been finishing our revised PDP Team training (coming soon to a CESA near you) and more recently the licensing items in the state budget, but we hope to have things out sometime in August.

Friday, July 10, 2015

Licensing-related Items in the State Budget

The following licensing-related items were included in the state budget, which is currently awaiting the Governor's signature and vetoes.

Alternative Teacher License 
AGENCY REQUEST: No request.

GOVERNOR:
Require the State Superintendent to grant a teaching license to an individual who meets all the following requirements: (a) has a bachelor’s degree; (b) demonstrates proficiency in the subject area or areas that he or she intends to teach by passing a competency exam approved by the Department; and (c) has relevant experience in the subject area or areas that he or she intends to teach, as determined by the Department. Specify that a license granted to an individual meeting these requirements would authorize the individual to teach in grades six through 12 only in the subject area or areas in which he or she demonstrated proficiency and relevant experience. The license would be valid for three years, and would be renewable for three-year periods. Provide $20,000 PR annually above base level funding of $3,417,000 PR to reflect the estimated increase in revenue associated with the alternative licensing process.

JOINT FINANCE:
Experienced-Based Licensure for Technical Education

  • Delete the Governor’s recommendation. Require the Department to grant an initial teaching license to teach a technical education subject, including technology education and any technology related occupation, to an individual who scores at least 100 points based on a point system, with at least 25 points based on the individual’s experience in a technical field and at least 25 points based on pedagogical experience, and agrees to complete a curriculum determined by the school board of the district in which the individual would teach. Specify that an individual granted a teaching license under this provision would not be required to possess a bachelor's degree.
  • Specify that the following point values would be assigned based on the individual's experience in a technical field: (a) for a bachelor's degree in any science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) field and any teaching license or permit, 100 points; (b) for a bachelor's degree in any STEM field, 75 points; (c) for a bachelor's degree in another field, 65 points; (d) for industry certification, 90 points; (e) for industry experience in a trade or technical field, five points per 40 hours worked up to a maximum of 90 points; (f) for an internship in a trade or technical field, 25 points; (g) for being mentored in a trade or technical skill by a colleague or a Wisconsin Technology Education Association approved mentor, 25 points; and (h) for an apprenticeship in a trade or technical field, five points per 40 hours worked up to a maximum of 90 points.
  • Specify that the following point values would be assigned based on the individual's pedagogical experience: (a) for a bachelor's degree in technical or technology education, 100 points; (b) for a bachelor's degree in a non-STEM field and any teaching license or permit, 75 points; (c) for credit earned at an accredited institution of higher education or technical college, three points per credit up to a maximum of 75 points for technical or technology education courses and STEM courses and three points per credit up to a maximum of 75 points for education and pedagogical course; and (d) for completing at least 100 hours of training in pedagogy, five points per 50 hours up to a maximum of 75 points.
  • Require the Department to verify the applicant's qualifications using the following: (a) the applicant's transcript for the applicable degree or credits, for bachelor's degrees or credits earned at an accredited institution of higher education or technical college; (b) the applicant's industry certificate, for industry certification; (c) the signature of a supervisor, employer, or other reliable observer, for industry experience, an internship, or mentoring; or (d) verification by a course instructor, transcript, or certificate for pedagogy training. Provide that if the individual is unable to provide the required verification, the Department could use any other proof of the applicant's experience approved by the Department.
  • Specify that the individual must agree to complete the curriculum determined by the school board of the school district in which the individual would teach during the term of the license. Specify that an initial teaching license granted under this procedure would be valid for three years. Require that the Department issue to the license holder a professional teaching license to teach the technical education subject if the individual successfully completed the curriculum, as determined by the school board of the school district.
  • Require the Department to approve or deny an application for a technical education license no later than 45 business days after receipt of the application. Require Department to provide, in writing, the reason for the denial if the application is denied. Specify that if does not act within 45 business days, the application would be considered approved and the applicant considered a licensed teacher until the Department approves or denies the application.
  • Specify that these provisions would not prohibit the Department from granting a teaching license or permit to teach a technical education subject under current law provisions. Provide that a permit to teach industrial arts subjects could be issued to an applicant who is certified by the technical college system board to teach an industrial arts or similar subject.
Licensure Based on Reciprocity

  • Create a new provision requiring the Department to grant an initial teaching license to any individual who was granted a teaching license by another state and completed at least one year of teaching experience in that state.
  • Additionally, require the Department to grant an administrator license to any individual who was granted an administrator license by another state and completed at least one year of administrator experience in that state.
  • Provide that the individual must have received an offer of employment from a school in Wisconsin prior to applying for such a license, and the application must be completed by both the applicant and the employing school/school district. Specify that the license type, including the subject area and grade level, would be determined by the Department based on the individual’s out-of-state license type or experience. 

Teacher License Based on Completion of Montessori Teacher Education Program 
AGENCY REQUEST: No request.

GOVERNOR: No request.

JOINT FINANCE:

  • Require that the Department grant an initial license to teach to an individual who meets the following requirements: (a) has a bachelor's degree; (b) successfully completed a teacher education program accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education; (c) successfully completed an introductory course in special education for which the individual earned at least three postsecondary credits; and (d) earned a passing score on any standardized examinations required by the State Superintendent for a license to teach the same educational levels and subjects issued in accordance with existing state law regarding teacher licenses, and on an examination identical to the foundations of reading test administered in 2012 as part of the Massachusetts tests for educator licensure. Specify that other current law requirements regarding teacher licensing would not apply, except that the individual would be required to undergo a background investigation equivalent to that of other candidates for licensure.
  • Specify that the teaching license would authorize an individual to teach the educational levels for which the individual has successfully completed a teacher education program accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education at a school that uses the Montessori method as its primary method of instruction. The State Superintendent would be required to treat an initial license to teach granted under this proposal in the same manner in which the State Superintendent treats initial licenses granted under existing state law.

Regional or National Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs
AGENCY REQUEST: No request.

GOVERNOR:  No request.

JOINT FINANCE:
Require the State Superintendent to accept accreditation by a regional or national institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S Department of Education or by a programmatic accrediting agency, if the State Superintendent requires that an institution of higher education be accredited for the purpose of granting a license to teach or for approving a teacher preparatory program.


Requirements to Renew a Teaching License
AGENCY REQUEST: No request.

GOVERNOR: No request.

JOINT FINANCE:
Require the Department to accept credits earned at any institution of higher education, as defined in federal law, if credits from an institution of higher education are required to renew a license to teach.


For more information, please see the 2015-17 Biennial Budget Information section at http://pb.dpi.wi.gov/.

Friday, July 3, 2015

What do I do if I did not submit my license renewal application by June 30th?

If you were not able apply for your license renewal or advancement before it expired on June 30th because you either had not completed your professional development requirement or did not yet have documentation, your options depend on your situation.  Please click on the scenario that is closest to yours:
  1. My five-year Professional Educator license expired June 30, and I completed my 6 credits prior to June 30th, but my transcript is not yet ready.
  2. My one-year Initial Educator License extension expired June 30th, and I am still finishing my PDP.  It will be verified this summer (between July 1 and August 31).
  3. My one-year Professional Educator License extension expired June 30th, and I am still finishing my six credits or PDP.  I will be done this summer (between July 1 and August 31). 
  4. My five-year Initial Educator License expired June 30th, and I am still finishing my PDP.  It should be verified this summer (between July 1 and August 31).
  5. My five-year Professional Educator License expired June 30th, and I am in a class finishing my six credits.  The class will finish this summer (between July 1 and August 31).
  6. My five-year Professional Educator License expires June 30th. I have not completed the professional development requirements.  I am not planning on teaching full time next year but would like to hold a five-year substitute license.
If none of these situations seem to apply to you, please submit a help ticket at http://dpi.wi.gov/support/contact-educator-licensing.

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Licensing Update 6/8/15

We are currently processing applications paid on:
  • 5-year renewals: April 25
  • Initial instate: May 8
  • Out-of-state: January 20
  • Emergency: May 19
  • Substitute: April 15
Changes we made for 2015 have greatly increased the percentage of applications that are complete as submitted, so we have been able to process applications faster this year.

New Pathways for Computer Science teacher license (1405)

The State Superintendent adopted the ETS Computer Science Praxis test for the License Based on a Content Test and the License Based on Equivalency pathways with a passing score of 171 effective June 8, 2015.

This means that an educator who holds a Professional, Master, or Life License in Mathematics (1400) can add a Computer Science license by scoring 171 or higher on ETS's new Computer Science Praxis test (#5651).  Also, an educator who completed an alternative route Computer Science preparation program in another state or has at least 3 years of Computer Science teaching experience in PK-12, postsecondary, and/or industry can now apply through our License Based on Equivalency pathway.

The following web pages still need to be updated, but they will have helpful information:

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Legislative action slides teacher licensing standards toward the bottom

Legislative action slides teacher licensing standards
toward the bottom

Major changes to teacher licensing voted into the 2015-17 state budget, without a hearing, puts Wisconsin on a path toward the bottom, compared to the nation, for standards required of those who teach at the middle and high school level. 

Adopted as a K-12 omnibus motion by the Joint Committee on Finance (JFC), the education package deregulates licensing standards for middle and high school teachers across the state. The legislation being rolled into the biennial budget would require the Department of Public Instruction to license anyone with a bachelor’s degree in any subject to teach English, social studies, mathematics, and science. The only requirement is that a public school or school district or a private choice school determines that the individual is proficient and has relevant experience in each subject they teach. Traditional licensure requires educators in middle and high school to have a bachelor’s degree and a major or minor in the subject they teach, plus completion of intensive training on skills required to be a teacher, and successful passage of skills and subject content assessments. 

Additionally, the JFC motion would require the DPI to issue a teaching permit for individuals who have not earned a bachelor’s degree, or potentially a high school diploma, to teach in any subject area, excluding the core subjects of mathematics, English, science, and social studies. The only requirement would be that the public school or district or private voucher school determines that the individual is proficient and has relevant experience in the subject they intend to teach. For both provisions in the JFC motion, the DPI would not be able to impose any additional requirements. This may preclude the fingerprinting and background checks required of all other licensed school staff. The standard also is lower than that currently required for teachers in choice and charter schools, who must have at least a bachelor’s degree.

“We are sliding toward the bottom in standards for those who teach our students,” said State Superintendent Tony Evers. “It doesn’t make sense. We have spent years developing licensing standards to improve the quality of the teacher in the classroom, which is the most important school-based factor in improving student achievement. Now we’re throwing out those standards.”

Currently, all 50 states require a beginning teacher to have a bachelor’s degree for traditional licensure, with a narrow exception for career and technical education teachers (Georgia). The states have differing standards for alternative routes to licensure, generally requiring major content coursework or a test in lieu of coursework for individuals to be eligible for an alternate route to earn a teaching license. 

“Wisconsin has several routes for career changers, who want to teach our elementary and secondary school students, to earn a teaching license through alternative programs,” Evers noted. “Emergency permits allow them to work under supervision while completing educator preparation program requirements. Each alternative route program ensures that candidates are supported and are ready to do the job independently when they complete alternative licensing requirements.”

Under provisions of the omnibus motion, the leaders of 424 public school districts, 23 independent public charter schools (2R charters), and potentially hundreds of private choice schools would determine who is qualified to teach in their schools. Current provisions of the JFC motion would restrict these licenses to teaching at the district or school that recommended the individual for licensure. 

“Learning about how children develop, managing a classroom and diffusing conflict among students, working with parents, and developing engaging lessons and assessments that inform instruction — these are the skills our aspiring educators learn in their training programs,” Evers said. “Teaching is much more than being smart in a subject area. 

“This motion presents a race to the bottom,” Evers said. “It completely disregards the value of the skills young men and women develop in our educator training programs and the life-changing experiences they gain through classroom observation and student teaching. This JFC action is taking Wisconsin in the wrong direction. You don’t close gaps and improve quality by lowering standards.” 


### NOTES: A “Pathways to Licensure” presentation that describes the various routes to earn an educator license in Wisconsin is available on the Department of Public Instruction website at http://pb.dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/pb/ppt/Preparation%20Pathways%20to%20Licensure%202%2019%202015.pptx. This news release is available electronically at http://dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/news-release/dpinr2015_58.pdf

News Release Education Information Services
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
125 South Webster Street
P.O. Box 7841
Madison, WI 53707-7841
Contact: Tom McCarthy, DPI Communications Officer, (608) 266-3559

Monday, March 30, 2015

Licensing Update 3/30/2014

Changes made to the Educator Licensing Online (ELO) system for 2015 renewals have reduced the percentage of applications submitted without required documentation and have speeded up processing times.

We are currently processing applications received on:

  • 5-year renewals: February 8
  • Initial instate: February 2
  • Out-of-state: December 10
  • Emergency: December 12
  • Substitute: January 29
Directions for renewing teacher, administrator, and pupil services licenses can be found at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/licensing/elo-renewal-tips.  For all other licenses, please start at http://dpi.wi.gov/elo.


Educator Preparation Program Annual Reports

In 2011, The Wisconsin State Legislature passed Act 166, which requires the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to produce an annual report of the State’s educator preparation programs (EPP). The report must include information on program completers and first time passage rates on the state required performance assessments.
The first report, the 2013 Educator Preparation Program (EPP) Annual Report, provides information on candidates who completed a Wisconsin EPP between September 1, 2011 and August 31, 2012 and were endorsed for Wisconsin licensure. It also provides valuable information on completers who applied for Wisconsin licensure and their employment in Wisconsin Public Schools the subsequent year. The annual report includes aggregated statewide data on all Wisconsin test takers during the report year. 
Statewide and individual institution reports can be found at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/epp/annual-reports.  

Monday, February 23, 2015

Computer Science Licensing Guidance

A new guidance document on license requirements for teaching computer science courses can be found at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/tepdl/pdf/Computer-Science-Guidance.pdf.  This document shows the difference between Computer Science and other aspects of K-12 education that involve computers (e.g., Technology/Computer Literacy and Fluency, Educational Technology,  Information Technology).  It identifies the criteria that make up a Computer Science course and lists the Coursework Completion System (CWCS) course codes that require a teacher to hold a license in Computer Science.

Monday, February 9, 2015

RtI Licensure Guidance

A new guidance document on licensure requirements within a Response to Intervention/Multi-level systems of support framework is available at http://tepdl.dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/tepdl/pdf/RtI-Licensure-Guidance.pdf.

The document provides specifics regarding what license is required to provide interventions and additional challenges for reading, math, and behavior.  It also includes the following section about instruction and support.

Instruction vs. Support
Teachers provide instruction, while paraprofessionals provide support to the student for that instruction. An appropriately licensed teacher or reading specialist designs the lessons, implements the lessons, and evaluates student learning.  Teachers licensed in other subject areas and paraprofessionals may provide reinforcement for learning activities but not the actual instruction itself.

“Teacher” is defined in PI 34 and under Wis. Stat. 40.02(55) as a school employee who demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions outlined in PI 34.02 (the Wisconsin Educator Standards) to improve pupil learning through the exercise of any educational function, including instructing pupils or administering, directing, or supervising any educational activity. “Teaching” is defined in PI 34.01(59) as improving pupil learning by planning instruction, diagnosing learning needs, prescribing content delivery through classroom activities, assessing student learning, reporting outcomes to administrators and parents, and evaluating the effects of instruction.  Interventions and additional challenges are considered instruction.  All of these activities must be provided by an appropriately licensed teacher or reading specialist.

Support is the reinforcement of instruction, reinforcement for an intervention, or reinforcement for an additional challenge that has already been provided by the appropriately licensed teacher or reading specialist.  Examples of support include:

·         assisting individual or groups of students with independent practice work assigned by the teacher.
·         assisting classroom teachers during guided reading with monitoring/assisting students with independent reading assignments, while the teacher works with small group guided reading instruction
·         taping (oral/video) oral reading selections for later analysis by the Title I or classroom teacher (taped running records)

Note: Some minor edits were made to the document on February 18, 2015, and March 10, 2015.